Service to the Stars

There is a certain excitement one gets when meeting a celebrity or popular socialite. We are so used to seeing them be amazing on the big screen and in magazines that when we come across them in everyday life we tend to lose ourselves. We regard these individuals as magical. But famous people, prominent politicians and internationally recognised business men and women are as human as you and I. I may not dine with the stars on a regular basis but one would assume they would prefer to be treated as such.

So as a crew member you are expected to have a sense of occasion even when the actor of your favourite Superman film steps onto your yacht. It is imperative that you conduct yourself professionally in order to make your passengers feel comfortable and adequately taken care of, whether you grew up with a poster of them above your bed or not.

 

Famous people spend most of their time in the public eye. If it isn’t a fan requesting a picture and an autograph, it’s the paparazzi harassing them for candid photos. Living your life in a fishbowl can have certain effects. So when famous people take measures to ensure their privacy it is important that it be respected. Telling your friends that Shia Labeouf is sunbathing on the deck of the yacht you work for, in the company of a flamboyance of fashion models, might make them envious of you for a while. Having that information reach the entertainment industry could have adverse effects. If your Captain finds out you disclosed privileged information your job on the yacht might be at risk.

 

Most training schools cover how crew is expected to conduct themselves with passengers. Captains should brief their teams on how to address various Dignitaries, Royalty and Heads of State before service begins. Being star struck is very rarely voluntary, however, taking a moment to compose yourself will go a long way in helping you keep your head in the presence of public figures. If you make a fool of yourself worry not; most celebrities are extremely understanding and down-to-earth, hardly like the persona’s gossip magazines and tabloids make them out to be.Take a moment to compose yourself and carry on with your service. If you treat them like you would other passenger that is enough.

 

Of course some famous people have a reputation of being diva’s. In that instance you should treat them as you would any demanding passenger you’ve had in the past. We’ve all encountered our fair share.

 

Meeting a celebrity is extremely exciting. Having them be in your presence over a few days is a dream come true for any person, and as a crew member you will experience such pleasures on many occasions. Practise discretion. Put yourself in the position of the socialite or dignitary and ask yourself how you’d want to be treated if you’d decided to take a few days away from the public eye to rest and recuperate. Your level of service should be no different. A VIP being on board might warrant you to put in extra effort but if you’re always giving passengers premium service you needn’t overexert yourself.

Famous people are exactly that; people. If you keep your cool and ensure you deliver great service they will surely enjoy their time on board with you and the rest of the crew.

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